(photos courtesy of Gabriela Bulisova and Mark Isaac)

Who Speaks for Me?

The mission of Who Speaks for Me? is to raise awareness about the intersection of trauma and women's incarceration by: engaging justice-involved women and girls with programming to understand and heal from trauma; empowering women and girls to become positive contributors to their families and communities; and providing technical assistance to criminal justice stakeholders, including: judges, defense attorneys, prosecutors, jail and prison staff and probation departments, to develop a trauma-informed justice system.

 

Our Beginning

Taylar Nuevelle (Photo courtesy of Mark Isaac)

Taylar Nuevelle (Photo courtesy of Mark Isaac)

Taylar Nuevelle, the founder of Who Speaks for Me?, has been blogging, writing, publishing and public speaking since she came home from prison in 2014 as the first phase of this organization that she created while incarcerated. All of her work involves Building a Trauma Informed Justice System for Women and Girls and bringing issues of justice-involved females into the Criminal Justice Reform Movement to end the Trauma-to-Prison Pipeline.

 

Some Statistics of Trauma Women Experience
Prior to Incarceration

 

86%

 

of women incarcerated in America are survivors of sexual violence.

77%

of women incarcerated in America are survivors of intimate partner abuse.

60%

of women incarcerated in America are survivors of abuse by caregivers/

"The special issues facing female prisoners are not getting the attention they desperately need.  Most programs to aid former prisoners are designed for men. Programs for women, when they exist, are often cookie-cutter copies of programs designed for men, despite the very different challenges they face. For example, women are typically incarcerated for property or drug possession offenses and are likely to have serious and long-term substance use problems.  Female prisoners returning home face more difficult reentry challenges with fewer skills and more deficits than men, and those differences manifest in higher rates of relapse and recidivism". --Gabriela Bulisova, Photo Journalist--from the series Convictions